Fume Cabinets & Laboratory Equipment...

Fume cabinets & ventilated enclosures are specially designed to contain hazardous & volatile materials. The enclosures isolate the chemicals and fumes from the main area of the laboratory and should a fire or incident occur it may not easily be detected by the buildings standard fire alarm.

To overcome this problem detection is needed within each enclosure and this can prove difficult when working with corrosive
or flammable substances.

Firetrace have designed a range of pneumatically operated systems specifically for this application that not only provide detection in these environments, but also fully automatic Fire suppression.

The Firetrace systems are autonomous and provide close individual protection for each cabinet or enclosure. They can be constantly monitored and interfaced with other services to achieve localised shut down or alarm activation. The pneumatic Firetrace systems are intrinsically safe and are available with ATEX rated pressure switches for specialist applications.

The Firetrace Solution

Firetrace offer affordable suppression systems to protect fume cabinets and laboratory equipment. In our 20 years’ experience in the manufacture of  suppression systems we have had countless documented cases where our devices have immediately detected and put out fires in fume cabinets, with either minimal or no damage to equipment at all.

The Firetrace systems for fume cabinets use our unique patented linear detection tubing which is installed throughout the cabinet ensuring the airflow & extraction paths are all covered. This tubing can quickly detect a fire and activate the system before the fire can spread to other areas.

The Firetrace systems do not need complex electronic detectors or panels and operate simply using pneumatics. This alleviates the need for separate power supplies or battery backups and also makes the entire system fail safe with minimal moving parts. The systems are safe for use in flammable areas and are available with a choice of extinguishants to suit specific types of chemistry.
Example of Firetrace Automatic Fire Suppression System Installation

So how does it work?

 
Firetrace systems use the patented linear detection tubing which is installed throughout the risk area and connected to the cylinder valve.
 
The tubing is then charged with nitrogen and this pressure is utilised to hold the Firetrace valve closed. 
 
Should a high temperature or fire occur then the pressurised tubing will burst releasing the extinguishant via dedicated discharge pipework & nozzles. 
 
A switch can also be added to the system which is held closed by the pressure.
 
Should the tubing burst or the pressure be lost for any reason then the switch will open and this signal can be used to isolate the power and/or raise an alarm.
Fume Cabinets In a Laboratory

 

Why Choose Firetrace?

 
Firetrace offer affordable suppression systems to protect fume cabinets and laboratory equipment.
 
As well as offering a full after sales service, we are accepted by most major insurance companies in the UK.
 
A choice of extinguishants are available including ABC Dry Powder, Alcohol resistant Foam and Carbon Dioxide.
Example of Firetrace Automatic Fire Suppression System Installation Into a Fume Cabinet

Manufacturing Company Disaster Averted Due to Firetrace Fire Suppression System

On November 4th 2019, Firetrace Ltd were contacted by a client after their CNC machine caught fire after an unexpected tool failure. Fortunately, they were very relieved and grateful to have had a Firetrace System installed on their machine which suppressed the fire efficiently.

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How We Deliver

Our fire suppression system design and technical team have many years experience in designing systems to suit specific applications.

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“The week before Christmas one of our students made a mistake in setting up one of our stills and unfortunately while distilling the unit went up in flames, before we had time to panic the Firetrace took over and the fire was out.” – Chemistry Department at University of York